the patient’s survival guide to:: syncope

<p>Lisa Cipkar</p>

Lisa Cipkar

January 27, 2021

Syncope, or fainting, can be one of the most terrifying symptoms you may feel while battling an illness. It is often the sign of the brain not getting enough oxygen, which results in fainting or near fainting. The tunnel vision, cold sweat and temporary paralysis can leave emotional scars. Syncope often hits suddenly and quickly, and leaves us in fear of leaving our safe spaces.

My goal as your health coach is to improve your quality of life with your illness by providing you with the right information for your bio individuality and your diagnosis. Syncope can appear differently in people but it does have a basic outline:

+a sudden loss or near loss of vision, strength in the body and ability to talk

+clamminess or a cold sweat

+pins and needle feeling in limbs or even the entire body

Other symptoms can present as well but these are the three usual symptoms.

If syncope or near syncope keeps rearing it’s ugly head at you, scope out this checklist and see if you can narrow in on the possible trigger. Then, email me for a consult and find out how to eliminate this issue for good! Knowing your trigger(s) is key in order to fix it. I find that doctors don’t talk often about this issue (“panic attack” anyone?) and this issue is a very common goal I work on with my clients.

possible near syncope triggers::

+as a pain response to any type of physical or emotional event (you may feel other adrenaline related symptoms if this is the case)

+hypoglycemia or ingestation of too much sugar. Balance that blood sugar!!

+DEHYDRATION. Your kidneys balance your body’s overall mineral levels. If you are chronically ill, you are in a constant state of mineral depletion. Make sure to drink your fluids and to include the proper electrolytes and minerals with them!

+a sudden change in blood volume. Were you constipated for several days and finally able to move your bowels? Did you have eat a large meal quickly? Experience loose stools or diarrhea in the past couple of days? Chug a ton of liquids? All of these events are known to trigger syncope episodes within 48 hours of happening. (fun fact:: this is the most common cause of POTS symptoms!)

+heat intolerance, too much sweating — even hours after coming inside.

+not exhaling as you change positions, allowing gravity to suck the oxygen out of your brain too quickly. Make this a habit!

I’ve had numerous syncope episodes during my years of Lyme disease and the POTS life. All of this info was gathered from my personal experience and the education of my doctors. I love teaching on this topic because the truth it, it is actually quite easy to correct this issue, but the process looks different for everyone. I encourage you to get in touch and schedule an intensive with me to come up with a plan of action for you, especially if you have POTS!

Hope this helped!

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